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Yahoo partners with Tata Sons’ CRL to collaborate on cloud computing research

Yahoo has signed an agreement with Computational Research Laboratories (CRL), a wholly owned subsidiary of Tata Sons Limited, to jointly support cloud computing research. As part of the agreement, CRL will make available to researchers one of the world’s top five supercomputers that is claimed to have substantially more processors than any supercomputer currently available for cloud computing research.

Yahoo has signed an agreement with Computational Research Laboratories (CRL), a wholly owned subsidiary of Tata Sons Limited, to jointly support cloud computing research. As part of the agreement, CRL will make available to researchers one of the world’s top five supercomputers that is claimed to have substantially more processors than any supercomputer currently available for cloud computing research.

“We are excited to partner with Yahoo to advance cloud computing research in India as it opens up a new arena of exciting opportunities,” Gautam Shroff, member of the steering committee of CRL, has said. “We are initiating dialogue with leading Indian academic institutions to collaborate on research using cloud computing.”

Cloud computing is a term recently popularised by Google CEO Eric Schmidt. According to Schmidt, cloud computing starts with the premise that the data services and architecture should be on servers. “We call it cloud computing – they should be in a ‘cloud’ somewhere. And that if you have the right kind of browser or the right kind of access, it doesn’t matter whether you have a PC or a Mac or a mobile phone or a BlackBerry or what have you – or new devices still to be developed – you can get access to the cloud,” Eric Schmidt has said.

Former IBM big brain Irving Wladawsky-Berger further explains the concept, “It is basically an internet-based network made up of large numbers of servers – mostly based on open standards, modular and inexpensive. Clouds contain vast amounts of information and provide a variety of services to large numbers of people. Users of the cloud only care about the service or information they are accessing – be it from their PCs, mobile devices, or anything else connected to internet – not about the underlying details of how the cloud works.”

GigaOm adds, “Done right, cloud computing allows application developers and IT operations to develop, deploy and run applications that can easily grow capacity (scalability), work fast (performance), and never — or at least rarely — fail (reliability), all without any concern as to the nature and location of the underlying infrastructure.”

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