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Top 5 marketing campaigns worldwide in 2014-2015: Warc 100

The Warc 100 is an
annual ranking of the world’s 100 best campaigns and companies, based on their
performance in effectiveness and strategy competitions. The list focuses on
marketing that makes a difference, driving business performance or changing
consumer behavior.

The rankings are
compiled based on the winners of 87 effectiveness and strategy awards from
around the world.

Here is the list of
the top 10 world’s best marketing campaigns 2014-2015:

The Warc 100 is an
annual ranking of the world’s 100 best campaigns and companies, based on their
performance in effectiveness and strategy competitions. The list focuses on
marketing that makes a difference, driving business performance or changing
consumer behavior.

The rankings are
compiled based on the winners of 87 effectiveness and strategy awards from
around the world.

Here is the list of
the top 10 world’s best marketing campaigns 2014-2015:

1. Dove (Unilever) – Real beauty Sketches

Dove’s Real Beauty Sketches is
a short film produced as part of the Dove Campaign for Real
Beauty marketing campaign. The aim of the film is to confront women about
their self-image and determine what they mean by ‘real beauty’.

In the video, which
was produced by the Ogilvy & Mather ad agency, an FBI trained
sketch artist drew his subjects based on both their self-descriptions and those
of people who had only just met them. The sketch artist never looked at the
subjects himself.

The two sketches
are then compared, with the stranger’s image invariably being both more
flattering and more accurate. The differences create strong reactions when
shown to the women. The artist’s subjects realised that other people view them
as more beautiful than they do themselves.

The film, which was
released globally online, created a viral sensation upon its online release in
April 2013. More than 15 million people downloaded the video within a week of
its release. This experiment was captured in a 6 minute online film, and the
side by side portraits were exhibited as a print and outdoor. The campaign
renewed Dove’s brand meaning and sparked value growth.

2. Unilever (India) – Kan Khajura Tesan

While most of the world is now connected by an overload of
entertainment via regular media and digital mediums, Bihar and Jharkhand are still
two of India’s most media-dark regions. However, with a population of 130
million they were key growth markets for Unilever, who had to find a way to
reach out to them. Kan
Khajura Tesan
(KKT), which literally translates to ‘ear worm radio channel’
in English, helped HUL brands engage with rural consumers in media dark areas.

Hindustan Unilever’s (HUL) ‘Kan Khajura Tesan’, developed by
Lowe Lintas & Partners and PHD, is a wholly mobile based
entertainment-on-demand initiative in India. The driving force behind this
campaign is the fact that a large percentage of the consumers for HUL brands
are in media dark villages and cannot be reached via traditional media like TV,
radio and print. In these rural areas access to TV and radio is limited and
further constrained by poor availability of electricity.

The branding identity was deployed using a catchy jingle, an
appealing mnemonic and a easy to remember number – 1800 3000 0123! The
promotional message makes the process of connecting with the channel crystal
clear; “Missed Call Lagaao, Muft Manoranjan Pao.”

This initiative was first piloted in Bihar and was later
extended across India. All people need to do is give a missed call to the
dedicated number to receive a call back from Kan Khajura Tesan with
pre-programmed content that consists of popular local music, Hindustan HUL
advertising spots, jokes and an RJ to host the show.

The service reached 25.5% of the popula­tion and grew
spontaneous awareness for Unilever brands.

3. Lifebuoy (Unilever
– India) – Help a child reach 5

Preventable hygiene related diseases are the biggest cause of child
deaths globally, killing 2.1m children every year. The ‘Help a child
reach 5’
campaign focused on making people aware of the importance of simple
hand-washing techniques, which could save lives.

A village in India was chosen to tell the story of child deaths and how
hand washing could help, with content created around the theme and people
around the world asked for support.

The cam­paign, which was developed by Lowe Lintas, focused on
positive human stories and received attention around the world, including 17
million views on YouTube and 16 million pledges of support on social media.

4. Vodafone (Egypt) –  Fakka
campaign

“Fakka” means ‘small
change’ in Arabic. This Vodafone Fakka campaign, designed by JWT Cairo, was
based on the insight that small change is a particular problem for consumers
and retailers alike in Egypt. Very often small retailers such as pharmacies,
vegetable stores or corner shops do not have a ready supply of small change for
their customers. This cultural insight was used to position its new
micro-credit charge card product in Egypt.

This approach made the product look valu­able compared to
the items usually received as change, and avoided making it look low-value, in
comparison to higher value charge cards.

A TVC
promoted the product, and its design allowed it to be kept in cash registers,
with point of sale material placed to remind shoppers and shopkeepers of the
product.

Vodafone “Fakka” micro re-charge cards have become a new
currency in Egypt with little shops up and down the country stocking the
“Fakka” cards to use as change, giving Vodafone Egypt the biggest distribution
channel possible.

5. Metro Trains Melbourne (Australia) – Dumb Ways to Die

‘Dumb Ways to Die’ campaign
is a public service announcement by Metro Trains, the metropolitan rail service
in Australia’s second largest city Melbourne, to promote rail safety. The
campaign video, which went viral through sharing and social media, started in
November 2012.

Metro Trains, had to find a way to get young people to care
about being safe around trains in a bid to prevent need­less deaths and
accidents. In its 3 minute black humour music video called Dumb Ways To Die
featured twenty-one characters killing themselves in increasingly stupid ways,
which culminated in the last three characters being killed by trains due to
unsafe behavior.

It was viewed 2.5 million times within 48 hours and 4.7
million times within 72 hours. Within two weeks, the video had been viewed 30
million times. As of March 2015, the video received over 100 million views.

The campaign, which was devised by advertising agency McCann
Melbourne, appeared in newspapers, local radio, outdoor advertising, throughout
the Metro Trains network and on Tumblr.

John Mescall, executive creative director of McCann, said,
“The aim of this campaign is to engage an audience that really doesn’t want to
hear any kind of safety message, and we think Dumb Ways To Die will.”

McCann estimated that within two weeks, it had generated at
least $50 million worth of global media value in addition to more than 700
media stories, for “a fraction of the cost of one TV ad”.

According to Metro Trains, the campaign contributed to a
more than 30% reduction in “near-miss” accidents, from 13.29
near-misses per million kilometres in November 2011 – January 2012, to 9.17
near-misses per million kilometres in November 2012 – January 2013.

In May 2013, Metro even released a “Dumb Ways to
Die” game as an app for iOS devices. The game, developed by Julian Frost
and Samuel Baird, invites players to avoid the dangerous activities engaged in
by the various characters featured throughout the campaign. Within the app,
players can also pledge to “not do dumb stuff around trains.” 

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