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M Arrington, J Adelson, M Zuckerberg among TIME 100 most influential people

Time magazine has included Jay Adelson, CEO, Digg.com; Michael Arrington, founder and editor, TechCrunch; Steve Jobs, CEO, Apple; Steve Ballmer, CEO, Microsoft; and Mark Zuckerberg, founder and CEO, Facebook among 100 most influential people in the world, The 2008 TIME 100.

Time magazine has included Jay Adelson, CEO, Digg.com; Michael Arrington, founder and editor, TechCrunch; Steve Jobs, CEO, Apple; Steve Ballmer, CEO, Microsoft; and Mark Zuckerberg, founder and CEO, Facebook among 100 most influential people in the world, The 2008 TIME 100.

Jay Adelson runs a human-powered media website. “So if the people choose the news, what exactly does Digg’s CEO do? He manages the community, grows the business and curates the arcane algorithms that translate votes into ranking and placement,” writes Lev Grossman.

Michael Arrington “is the quintessential blogger: intense, passionate, consumed with his subject, opinionated, sleep-deprived, forward-thinking, easy to irritate and apt to air his grudges in public. Arrington’s vast network of Silicon Valley sources—many gained through his legendary parties—allows him to be ahead of the tech-biz curve and often play Web 2.0 kingmaker,” writes Arianna Huffington.

Steve Jobs, a college dropout who takes only $1 a year in salary, “is a canny CEO who knows how to sell product… He now presides over a company with $24 billion in annual sales and 22,000 employees… Jobs gets called mercurial, egomaniacal, a micromanager. If that sounds a little like a CEO doing his job, maybe that’s because he is—and a mighty fine one,” writes Barbara Kiviat.

Steve Ballmer is “truly WYSIWYG—what you see is what you get—maybe more so than Microsoft’s products… If you want 95% of the wallets of every market that you’re in, then you want this Steve. If you want 95% of the mind share of every market that you’re in, then you need the other Steve (Jobs)… Whether you like the company or not, give credit where credit is due: Steve Ballmer kicks ass,” writes Guy Kawasaki.

Mark Zuckerberg launched Facebook as a campuswide system and later expanded it to other colleges. “The site exploded nationally and globally, and with that came tens of millions of dollars from investors, buyout offers from Yahoo! and Viacom, and a worldwide community of Facebook users. All that happened because Zuckerberg has remained true to his vision, focusing on building a community rather than on a mere exit strategy…” writes Craig Newmark.

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