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Google hacking ordered by a top Chinese politician: WikiLeaks

The hacking of Google that forced the US-based internet company to withdraw from China earlier this year was orchestrated by Li Changchun, who is ranked fifth in the ruling Chinese Communist Party politburo and is in charge of propaganda and censorship in China, after Changchun found internet search results personally critical of him, claim the latest round of WikiLeaks disclosures.

The hacking of Google that forced the US-based internet company to withdraw from China earlier this year was orchestrated by Li Changchun, who is ranked fifth in the ruling Chinese Communist Party politburo and is in charge of propaganda and censorship in China, after Changchun found internet search results personally critical of him, claim the latest round of WikiLeaks disclosures.

“That single act prompted a politically-inspired assault on Google, forcing it to ‘walk away from a potential market of 400 million internet users’ in January this year, amid a highly publicised row about internet censorship,” according to a classified document reportedly sent by US diplomats in Beijing to the US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. [Source: Guardian]

In January 2010, David Drummond, senior vice president, corporate development and chief legal officer, Google, said, “In mid-December, we detected a highly sophisticated and targeted attack on our corporate infrastructure originating from China that resulted in the theft of intellectual property from Google.”

According to David Drummond, Google had evidence to suggest that a primary goal of the attackers was accessing the Gmail accounts of Chinese human rights activists and that the accounts of dozens of US-, China- and Europe-based Gmail users who are advocates of human rights in China appeared to have been routinely accessed by third parties.

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