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Cuil launches internet search engine Cuil.com; aims to unseat Google

US-based startup Cuil (pronounced as ‘cool’) has launched an internet search engine Cuil.com that ranks results by the content on each page and not its popularity. The company claims to have indexed 120 billion web pages, three times more than any other search engine. Cuil has received series A funding from Tugboat Ventures and Greylock Partners, and series B funding from Madrone Capital Partners.

US-based startup Cuil (pronounced as ‘cool’) has launched an internet search engine Cuil.com that ranks results by the content on each page and not its popularity. The company claims to have indexed 120 billion web pages, three times more than any other search engine. Cuil has received series A funding from Tugboat Ventures and Greylock Partners, and series B funding from Madrone Capital Partners.

Tom Costello, CEO and co-founder, Cuil, has said, “Our significant breakthroughs in search technology have enabled us to index much more of the Internet, placing nearly the entire Web at the fingertips of every user. In addition, Cuil presents searchers with content-based results, not just popular ones, providing different and more insightful answers that illustrate the vastness and the variety of the Web.”

Cuil derives its name from an old Irish word for knowledge. The company is led by husband-and-wife team Tom Costello and Anna Patterson. Costello researched and developed search engines at Stanford University and IBM. Patterson is best known for her work at Google, where she led a web page ranking team. Together with Russell Power, Anna’s former colleague from Google, they founded Cuil.

According to Cuil, its search engine gives users a richer display of results and offers organizing features, such as tabs to clarify subjects, images to identify topics and search refining suggestions to help guide users to the results they seek. Cuil’s magazine-style layout separates results by subject and allows further search by concept or category.

Cuil says it does not keep any personally identifiable information on users or their search histories. Since the search engine ranks pages based on content instead of number of clicks, personal data collection is unnecessary, so personal search history is always private, the company has said.

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